Letters from Lillie

June 2013 Vol 4, No 3
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
Program Director and Co-Founder, AONN+; University Distinguished Service Professor of Breast Cancer, Departments of Surgery and Oncology; Administrative Director, The Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Director, Cancer Survivorship Programs at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Professor, JHU School of Medicine, Departments of Surgery, Oncology, Gynecology & Obstetrics - Baltimore, MD

Dear Reader,

Although it may be summer, which is known for being a time that employees take vacations, we all know that there is no vacation for our patients who have been diagnosed and are undergoing treatment for their cancer. Other than those patients with metastatic disease who might be able to take a “drug holiday”—better known as a break from the toxic drugs for a period of time while their cancer seems to be a bit more stable—in general, cancer is with us during every season. Patients rely on their navigators no matter what the season, upcoming holiday, or your personal vacation plans, so thank you for being so committed to providing quality navigation to your patients so consistently, and with such compassion.

This issue of JONS offers several special features. You will learn a new term called “boundary spanning” in an article from Pennsylvania State University. You will also learn about the work being done in Appalachia as it relates to ensuring that the navigator skills and knowledge “match” the needs and available resources.
We are all familiar with making sure the right patient gets the right drug, at the right time, using the right method, and in the right setting. Well, we all need to bring to the attention of the leadership at our respective institutions the importance of doing something quite similar when it comes to navigation—identifying the skills, knowledge, and expertise needed of a navigator to carry out specific tasks and functions. There are tasks and functions that can be carried out very well by a lay navigator, but other tasks and functions require medical knowledge and expertise, which require nursing knowledge.

Also in this issue is the next installment of the resources being provided by another pharmaceutical company that I have summarized for you; for this issue, I chose Merck Pharmaceuticals.

We are very busy planning for our 4th Annual AONN Conference. It is marvelous to see how many of you have already registered to attend. I am personally looking forward to seeing familiar faces as well as new faces in November in Memphis. The networking opportunities are truly boundless, and the knowledge you will gain from the speakers we have lined up for you will be phenomenal.

We hope you enjoy this issue. And remember, I am just a mouse click away if you need to personally reach out to me with questions or feedback about AONN. My e-mail is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

With kind regards,

Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS
Editor-in-Chief

Related Articles
“Establishing a Successful Navigation Program”: A JONS Exclusive Series
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
|
October 2018 Vol 9, NO 10

How do you establish a successful navigation program? The answers are right here in this issue!

Journal of Oncology Navigation & Survivorship: Providing an Array of Topics Relevant to Navigators
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
|
September 2018 Vol 9, No 9
On behalf of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Oncology Navigation & Survivorship (JONS), it's my pleasure to offer the current issue. Each month, we aim to present navigators with an array of topics relevant to their practice. To achieve our goal, we publish original navigation research, treatment updates, interviews, and navigation best practices. Some highlights from the current issue follow.
The Benefits of Humor When Confronted with Cancer
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
|
August 2018 Vol 9, No 8
Some days it's hard to laugh and easy to cry, especially when confronted with the harsh reality of cancer. But according to Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG, Director of Cancer Survivorship Programs at Johns Hopkins, finding humor in the day-to-day can actually boost the immune system and improve the overall health of patients with cancer.
Last modified: July 17, 2018

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