Improving Oncology Care with Patient Education

March 2016 Vol 7, No 2
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
Editor-in-Chief, JONS; Program Director, AONN+; University Distinguished Service Professor of Breast Cancer, Administrative Director, The Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Director, John Hopkins Cancer Survivorship Programs; Professor of Surgery and Oncology, JHU School of Medicine; Co-Creator, Work Stride-Managing Cancer at Work
shockli@jhmi.edu

Hello everyone and welcome to the March 2016 issue of the Journal of Oncology Navigation & Survivorship (JONS)! This issue includes pertinent information that covers a wide breadth of topics, all of which are applicable to your navigation work with patients with cancer.

We know that cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common side effects that patients with cancer experience, and it also commonly lingers after treatment is completed. Is exercise an effective way to reduce this troubling side effect? Find out in an article explaining how you can help your patients resume the active life they had before their diagnosis.

This issue also contains information about a particular type of cancer—multiple myeloma. Although the volume of patients with this type of cancer is not like that of prostate, breast, lung, or colorectal cancer in the United States, multiple myeloma has a huge impact on those who are diagnosed. In addition, March is Myeloma Awareness Month; take this opportunity to learn facts about this disease and its treatment, and raise public awareness about the symptoms and risks associated with multiple myeloma.

Continually increasing in incidence, diabetes is a common comorbidity, but did you know that it can also increase a patient’s risk for urologic diseases, such as bladder cancer? In addition, it is a contributor to other quality-of-life–altering side effects, such as bladder dysfunction and sexual disorders. Read through this issue and see whether this is impacting the patients you navigate.

Over the past few years, there have been changes made to the cancer screening guidelines of several types of cancer. In this issue of JONS, you will learn, specifically, about the changes to the cervical cancer screening guidelines, which have become the most relaxed they have ever been since their inception. Is this change good or bad? Read on to find out, and factor this information into the education you provide your patients with regard to getting their Papanicolaou tests. You may even choose to write your own article on the cervical cancer screening guidelines.

This, however, begs the question: Are you ready to write a research abstract? Do not avoid reading our featured article on this subject! Designed to eliminate your fears and empower you to seriously consider taking a crack at writing your abstract, this article includes information on how to prepare to write your abstract, components of a research abstract, and where to look for inspiration.

Another article covers the subject of colorectal cancer, which is one of the most common forms of cancer diagnosed today. This article is dedicated to providing information about navigating patients from the point of screening, to diagnosis, through treatment, and into long-term survivorship care. We hope that reading it helps those navigating this patient population.

Based on feedback from Academy of Oncology Nurse & Patient Navigators members who read JONS and value its content, we are in the process of increasing its frequency. So plan to receive your next issue of JONS in April and monthly thereafter!

With kind regards,

Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS
Editor-in-Chief
University Distinguished Service Associate Professor of Breast Cancer, Depts of Surgery and Oncology;
Administrative Director, The Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Director, Cancer Survivorship Programs at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins;
Associate Professor, JHU School of Medicine, Depts of Surgery, Oncology & Gynecology and Obstetrics; Associate Professor, JHU School of Nursing
Baltimore, MD
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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November 2018 Vol 9, NO 11

This time of year is one of great excitement for us at JONS and the Academy of Oncology Nurse & Patient Navigators (AONN+).

The Value of Palliative Care Early in the Treatment Process
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
|
Best Practices in Breast Cancer – October 2018 Vol 9
Palliative care has a serious identity problem. Seventy percent of Americans describe themselves as “not at all knowledgeable” about palliative care, and most healthcare professionals believe it is synonymous with end-of-life care.1 This perception is not far from current medical practice, because specialty palliative care—administered by clinicians with expertise in palliative medicine—is predominantly offered through hospice care or inpatient consultation only after life-prolonging treatment has failed. This means that the majority of patients who could benefit from palliative care are not receiving it until they are very close to death. To ensure that patients with metastatic breast cancer receive the best cancer care throughout their disease trajectory, palliative care should be initiated alongside standard oncology care, and it should be implemented early.
Recognizing Progress and Encouraging Further Strides in Breast Cancer
Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
|
Best Practices in Breast Cancer – October 2018 Vol 9
In addition to the obligatory orange and black decorations of October, it’s also the time of year to don your pink in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month! The progress we have made as a nation in elevating the importance of regular breast cancer screenings, funding research, and supporting breast cancer survivors has had a direct impact on our ability to increase and improve survivorship.
Last modified: June 10, 2018

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